MX 241 ENDURANCE
MX 241 ENDURANCE
MX 241 ENDURANCE
MX 241 ENDURANCE
MX 241 ENDURANCE
MX 241 ENDURANCE

MX 241 ENDURANCE

3014924

Regular price $379.99
/
4 in stock

Width
Color
Sizes

MX Competition Last – Featuring a larger toe box & tighter heel than the Comfort last and with slightly more overall volume than the Sport last. Exceptionally secure for hard riding/racing with enough room in the toe box to prevent binding when running up inclines or negotiating a hike-a-bike section. Designed for performance riding & racing.

Lake Competition 100% Carbon Fiber Sole with Mountain Race X real rubber sole

Helcor Abrasion resistant leather, full grain leather and Nufoam lining. Heat moldable carbon heel counter. 

Dual Side mounted Push/Pull IP1 BOA lacing system with releasable lace guides


Check out our full size guide:

Looking for the ultimate online size guide? Check out our full size guide so you can hone in on the best shoe fit that Lake has to offer.

  1. Step 1: Measuring your foot
  2. Step 2: Review sizing chart
  3. Step 3: Review fit matrix
  4. Step 4: Review shoe lasts

SIZE CHART

LAST LENGTH / SHOE SIZE (add +5mm to your measured length to get correct shoe length) COMFORT PLUS WIDTH
ROAD: CX201
SPORT LAST WIDTHS
ROAD: CX176, CX145, TX213
MTB: MX176, MX168, MX1, MX145
COMPETITION LAST WIDTHS
ROAD: CX218, CX238, CX241, CX1-C, TX223, TX322
MTB: MX218, MX238, MX241, MX1-C
RACE LAST
WIDTHS
ROAD: CX301, CX332, CX403(Regular & Wide Only)
MTB: MX332
WINTER LAST WIDTHS
MTB: MXZ304
MTB: (Wide only) MXZ176, MXZ200, MXZ400
ROAD: (Wide only) CXZ176
Milimeters EU Regular Regular Wide Regular Wide Regular Wide Extra Wide Regular Wide
224.5 - 227 36 92 85 87 83 78
230.5 - 234 37 94 87 88 85 80
234.5 - 237 37.5 88 89 85
237.5 - 240 38 96 89 90 87 82
240.5 - 243 38.5 90 91 87
243.5 - 246 39 98 91 99.76 92 104 88 97.8 100.24 84 100.2
246.5 - 250 39.5 99 92 100.76 93 105 88 98.8 101.24
250.5 - 253 40 100 93 101.76 94 106 89 99.8 102.24 86 101.2
253.5 - 256 40.5 101 94 102.76 95 107 90 100.8 103.24
256.5 - 260 41 102 95 103.76 96 108 91 101.8 104.24 88 103.2
260.5 - 263 41.5 103 96 104.76 97 109 92 102.8 105.24
263.5 - 266 42 104 97 105.76 98 110 93 103.8 106.24 90 105.2
266.5 - 270 42.5 105 98 106.76 99 111 94 104.8 107.24
270.5 - 273 43 106 99 107.76 100 112 95 105.8 108.24 92 106.7
273.5 - 276 43.5 107 100 108.76 101 113 96 106.8 109.24
276.5 - 280 44 108 101 109.76 102 114 97 107.8 110.24 94 108.2
280.5 - 283 44.5 109 102 110.76 103 115 98 108.8 111.24
283.5 - 286 45 110 103 111.76 104 116 99 109.8 112.24 96 110.7
286.5 - 290 45.5 111 104 112.76 105 117 100 110.8 113.24
290.5 - 293 46 112 105 113.76 106 118 101 111.8 114.24 98 112.2
293.5 - 296 46.5 113 106 114.76 107 119 103 112.8 115.24
296.5 - 300 47 114 107 115.76 108 120 103 113.8 116.24 100 114.2
303.5 - 306 48 115 109 116.76 110 122 105 115.8 118.24 102 116.2
309.5 - 313 49 116
313.5 - 316.5 50 118 113 120.76 114 126 108 119.8 122.24 106 120.2

Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
100%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
M
Michael Percy
A solution after decades of narrower cycling shoes

I have "normal" D width feet, and have been an active year round cyclist for over 50 years (now in Maine winters too). Until 3-4 years ago I never had any foot issues whatsoever during any activity. Since 2018 I have experienced increasing numbness and pain in the metatarsal area, and the formation of a small painful bunion on the right foot. None of my conventional cycling shoes became wearable, and I took the "drastic" step of first slicing open the sides of my cycling shoes, then finally installing flat pedals on my road and mountain bikes. For flat pedal footwear, I resorted to a pair of not wide FiveTen shoes with 1/2" x 2" cutouts made on either side of the forefoot area, and cycled with my arch more or less centered over the pedal axle. This arrangement I used exclusively over this past summer (actually works quite well and respectably efficient). With the exception of residual metatarsal numbness, which I expect will never go away, my feet are now pain free and the bunion almost non-existent. I also resorted to upgrading all my other walking and running shoes to extra wide EE sizing and installed gel insoles in all.

As a "last ditch" effort to return to cleated shoes and conventional forefoot pedaling, I purchased a pair of Lake MX241 "wide" cycling shoes. These sat unused over the summer while I rode with my butchered FiveTens until my feet recovered. I did not want to use the MX241 cleat-less, nor did I want to drill out the soles for mid-foot cleat placement. Finally, a few weeks ago, I felt ready to try the MX241's with cleats. The dual BOA arrangement is precisely what was needed. I snug up the rear BOA comfortably, and leave the front BOA almost entirely loose. After several dozen rides now (1-3 hours duration), I can definitively say these shoes seem to be an excellent solution. No pain, and the residual numbness I have is no worse than end of summer with my flat pedal setup. I don't expect that numbness to ever go away entirely, no matter what the activity, or the shoe type - the damage has been done. Absence of pain is all that I require.

The MX241 "wide" is an excellent shoe, albeit rather heavy compared to my light "road" shoes, but I'm past caring too much about that, and no longer want shoes I can't walk in for any distance, even if almost all my riding is on the road. Having communicated extensively with Lake during purchase, I will offer that I disagree with their contention that their sizing cannot be numerically related to conventional shoes. Perhaps you can go a half EU size smaller than your other cycling shoes, but measurements they had me make yielded sizing at least a full size smaller, which absolutely did not work for me. All my other cycling shoes (which I won't wear now) are a 43-43.5. The Lake size I settled on is a 43.5. I could probably get away with a 43, but the 43.5 gave me a slightly wider toe box, and I am now a firm believer that you can "never" have a too wide toe box, as long as the heel and arch area are not a sloppy fit.

While I rode for decades with a broad range of makes and types of road and mountain bike shoes without issue, if I had one piece of hindsight advice to offer to my long past 20 year old self, or any young cyclist starting out - absolutely purchase shoes with a wide toe box from the get-go, and install gel forefoot padding, perhaps with a metatarsal "bump". There is no performance disadvantage in doing this, no matter how competitive you are. Had I done this 50+ years ago, I'm convinced the issues I experienced would likely never have occurred. This wide recommendation goes for all types of shoes too, running, hiking, walking - all should have a very roomy toe box, and that can be surprisingly challenging to find.

I believe cycling to be the most stressful activity for the metatarsal area of your feet. That constant forefoot pressure is a repetitive stress that is entirely unnatural in an evolutionary sense. I ran marathons for years with never a foot issue, and even now, on days when the weather is too foul for riding, and I opt for a run instead, this never bothers my feet or aggravates the residual metatarsal issues I have. I believe particular care should be exercised when fitting cycling shoes, and it may well be for some, that a locked in cleated forefoot position on a pedal will never be satisfactory. Do not dismiss the option of flat pedals that allow varying foot position if you must. That saved my cycling over the summer, and were efficient far beyond my conventional expectation, although I don't think anyone makes a cleatless type shoe that is really stiff enough to completely prevent uneven pressure from the pedals (nor are any wide enough). As a cleated cycle shoe option though, I don't think you can do better than the MX241 "wide". I'm happy.

R
Robert Barr
Beyond Happy

I was at my local bike shop having my Madone serviced. While speaking with one of the techs, he mentioned Lake Shoes and how great they were. After contemplating the cost, I can honestly say it was money well spent, and I will spend the money again. The 241 is exceptionally comfortable and made well.

R
RT
Legit 👍🏾

Yep, love the Lake MX241 Endurance Shoe!
Bought one for myself and then one pair for my wife and we couldn’t be happier.
This shoe is comfortable, stiff, stylish and very adjustable.
I’m giving two thumbs up 👍🏾👍🏾
RT

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Customer Reviews

Based on 3 reviews
100%
(3)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
M
Michael Percy
A solution after decades of narrower cycling shoes

I have "normal" D width feet, and have been an active year round cyclist for over 50 years (now in Maine winters too). Until 3-4 years ago I never had any foot issues whatsoever during any activity. Since 2018 I have experienced increasing numbness and pain in the metatarsal area, and the formation of a small painful bunion on the right foot. None of my conventional cycling shoes became wearable, and I took the "drastic" step of first slicing open the sides of my cycling shoes, then finally installing flat pedals on my road and mountain bikes. For flat pedal footwear, I resorted to a pair of not wide FiveTen shoes with 1/2" x 2" cutouts made on either side of the forefoot area, and cycled with my arch more or less centered over the pedal axle. This arrangement I used exclusively over this past summer (actually works quite well and respectably efficient). With the exception of residual metatarsal numbness, which I expect will never go away, my feet are now pain free and the bunion almost non-existent. I also resorted to upgrading all my other walking and running shoes to extra wide EE sizing and installed gel insoles in all.

As a "last ditch" effort to return to cleated shoes and conventional forefoot pedaling, I purchased a pair of Lake MX241 "wide" cycling shoes. These sat unused over the summer while I rode with my butchered FiveTens until my feet recovered. I did not want to use the MX241 cleat-less, nor did I want to drill out the soles for mid-foot cleat placement. Finally, a few weeks ago, I felt ready to try the MX241's with cleats. The dual BOA arrangement is precisely what was needed. I snug up the rear BOA comfortably, and leave the front BOA almost entirely loose. After several dozen rides now (1-3 hours duration), I can definitively say these shoes seem to be an excellent solution. No pain, and the residual numbness I have is no worse than end of summer with my flat pedal setup. I don't expect that numbness to ever go away entirely, no matter what the activity, or the shoe type - the damage has been done. Absence of pain is all that I require.

The MX241 "wide" is an excellent shoe, albeit rather heavy compared to my light "road" shoes, but I'm past caring too much about that, and no longer want shoes I can't walk in for any distance, even if almost all my riding is on the road. Having communicated extensively with Lake during purchase, I will offer that I disagree with their contention that their sizing cannot be numerically related to conventional shoes. Perhaps you can go a half EU size smaller than your other cycling shoes, but measurements they had me make yielded sizing at least a full size smaller, which absolutely did not work for me. All my other cycling shoes (which I won't wear now) are a 43-43.5. The Lake size I settled on is a 43.5. I could probably get away with a 43, but the 43.5 gave me a slightly wider toe box, and I am now a firm believer that you can "never" have a too wide toe box, as long as the heel and arch area are not a sloppy fit.

While I rode for decades with a broad range of makes and types of road and mountain bike shoes without issue, if I had one piece of hindsight advice to offer to my long past 20 year old self, or any young cyclist starting out - absolutely purchase shoes with a wide toe box from the get-go, and install gel forefoot padding, perhaps with a metatarsal "bump". There is no performance disadvantage in doing this, no matter how competitive you are. Had I done this 50+ years ago, I'm convinced the issues I experienced would likely never have occurred. This wide recommendation goes for all types of shoes too, running, hiking, walking - all should have a very roomy toe box, and that can be surprisingly challenging to find.

I believe cycling to be the most stressful activity for the metatarsal area of your feet. That constant forefoot pressure is a repetitive stress that is entirely unnatural in an evolutionary sense. I ran marathons for years with never a foot issue, and even now, on days when the weather is too foul for riding, and I opt for a run instead, this never bothers my feet or aggravates the residual metatarsal issues I have. I believe particular care should be exercised when fitting cycling shoes, and it may well be for some, that a locked in cleated forefoot position on a pedal will never be satisfactory. Do not dismiss the option of flat pedals that allow varying foot position if you must. That saved my cycling over the summer, and were efficient far beyond my conventional expectation, although I don't think anyone makes a cleatless type shoe that is really stiff enough to completely prevent uneven pressure from the pedals (nor are any wide enough). As a cleated cycle shoe option though, I don't think you can do better than the MX241 "wide". I'm happy.

R
Robert Barr
Beyond Happy

I was at my local bike shop having my Madone serviced. While speaking with one of the techs, he mentioned Lake Shoes and how great they were. After contemplating the cost, I can honestly say it was money well spent, and I will spend the money again. The 241 is exceptionally comfortable and made well.

R
RT
Legit 👍🏾

Yep, love the Lake MX241 Endurance Shoe!
Bought one for myself and then one pair for my wife and we couldn’t be happier.
This shoe is comfortable, stiff, stylish and very adjustable.
I’m giving two thumbs up 👍🏾👍🏾
RT